Case Study

VAR Looks To Future New Cutting-Edge POS Solutions

Source: Harbortouch
Prediction Of Future Trends In The Global M&A Market For 2017

As a second-generation POS dealer, Delaware Valley Registers, Inc. (DVR) has had to make many adjustments to its business over the years to remain relevant. With the rapid pace of technological change in the retail and restaurant markets, resellers need a strategy to stay ahead of trends and provide their customers with the most powerful, secure, and cutting-edge solutions. For VARs who don’t, the result is typically them going out of business.

Barbara Lewis, manager of Delaware Valley Registers Inc., says she’s kept up with trends in the industry and noted the shift to the as-a-Service model as a business-saving move for many. “For our business and customers, we saw new technology coming into the market offered via a monthly subscription and couldn’t ignore it,” she says. “For a few years, we researched which new POS system we wanted our name associated with. In the end, Harbortouch’s products and business model were aligned with ours as far as support, warranty, and the relationships they build.” Take, for instance, a recent upgrade DVR completed for a customer of 15 years.

Antiquated ECRs Present Problems for Deli

The customer, a delicatessen that offers made-to-order breakfast and lunch items, was using ECRs that were starting to fail, prompting discussions between DVR and the deli owner about next steps. “They could continue using ECRs or move to something more sophisticated,” recalls Lewis. After spending some time evaluating the deli’s operations, Lewis realized the customer needed more than an ECR.

The deli, located in a prime location, was a popular spot. At times, the line would reach 20 to 30 customers deep. With long lines, processing sales quickly was important. Unfortunately, sales essentially had to be completed twice — once at the ECR and then again via a credit card terminal. The manual entry of the ticket value into the payment terminal was leading to frequent transposition errors by the hurried staff. Additionally, the ECR was limited in the number of items that could be programmed into the keyboard, and having employees memorize PLUs wasn’t an option.